David Bowie - The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars

David Bowie "The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars"

David Bowie's fifth studio album, "The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars" (commonly known as Ziggy Stardust), was released in 1972 by RCA Records. David Bowie co-produced the album with Ken Scott and collaborated with his backing band, the Spiders from Mars, which included Mick Ronson, Trevor Bolder, and Mick Woodmansey. The album's songs were written around the same time as David Bowie's previous album, Hunky Dory, and recording for Ziggy Stardust began shortly after Hunky Dory was completed.

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David Bowie's fifth studio album, "The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars" (commonly known as Ziggy Stardust), was released in 1972 by RCA Records. David Bowie co-produced the album with Ken Scott and collaborated with his backing band, the Spiders from Mars, which included Mick Ronson, Trevor Bolder, and Mick Woodmansey. The album's songs were written around the same time as David Bowie's previous album, Hunky Dory, and recording for Ziggy Stardust began shortly after Hunky Dory was completed.

Ziggy Stardust is a loose concept album and rock opera about David Bowie's fictional alter ego, Ziggy Stardust, an androgynous and bisexual rock star who is sent to Earth as a savior before an impending apocalypse. The album's concept was largely developed after the songs were recorded, and the glam rock and proto-punk musical styles were influenced by artists such as Iggy Pop, the Velvet Underground, and Marc Bolan of T. Rex. The album cover was photographed in monochrome and recolored outside of furriers "K. West" in London.

The album was preceded by the single "Starman" and peaked at number 5 in the UK and number 75 in the US. It received favorable reviews from critics, though some found the concept difficult to comprehend. David Bowie performed "Starman" on Britain's Top of the Pops in 1972, propelling him to stardom. The Ziggy Stardust character was retained for the subsequent Ziggy Stardust Tour, with Bowie struggling to differentiate between himself and his alter ego. David Bowie created a new character for his next album, Aladdin Sane, to avoid being defined by Ziggy.

Ziggy Stardust is now regarded as one of David Bowie's best works and has been included on numerous lists of the greatest albums of all time. David Bowie had ideas for a musical based on the album, which he later used for Diamond Dogs, but the project never came to fruition. The album has been reissued several times and was remastered for its 40th anniversary in 2012. In 2017, it was selected for preservation in the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress.